Saturday, January 4, 2014

Toast Topper #39: Dijon Mustard

It's no secret that I'm a total mustard freak. You name the variety, you can bet I've at least tried it, if not fallen in love with it! Mustard is probably my dipper, salad dressing base and savoury sandwich spread of choice, so much so that we buy gigantic food-service jugs of it and my mom keeps asking me why I haven't turned yellow yet!

Luckily, I'm not totally alone in my love for the condiment. My stepbrother is a particular fan of Dijon-style, which unfortunately only comes in tiny bottles and jars (which he empties onto one sandwich or burger). Since I was searching for something to include in his holiday basket this past Christmas, I decided to make him a jar. After all, I knew it was a fairly basic mixture of mustard seeds and vinegar for the most part. I found a pretty good looking recipe on Chow and made a couple additions to suit our needs and tastes. The best thing about homemade Dijon is that it only gets better with age - it tasted decent right after I blended it up, but after a week or two in the fridge it was amazing. Not bad for a few cents' worth of spices, some vinegar and the last of a bottle of wine!

Shared with Wellness Weekend

Dijon Mustard

Dijon Mustard
Makes 1 cup 2 tbsp, 18 (1 tbsp) servings
¼ cup brown mustard seeds
¼ cup yellow mustard seeds
⅔ cup dry white wine
½ cup white wine vinegar
¼ cup mustard powder
½ tsp Kosher salt
1 tsp honey (vegans, use agave nectar or maple syrup)
  1. Place mustard seeds, wine, and vinegar in a small bowl or container, cover, and let soak at room temperature for two days.
  2. Transfer mustard seeds and liquid to jar of a blender. 
  3. Add mustard powder, salt and honey. 
  4. Puree until a coarse paste forms, but whole seeds still remain. 
  5. Transfer to an airtight container and let rest in refrigerator for at least 2 days before use. 
Amount Per Serving
Calories: 37.4
Total Fat: 1.8 g
Cholesterol: 0.0 mg
Sodium: 31.8 mg
Total Carbs: 2.5 g
Dietary Fiber: 0.7 g
Protein: 1.9 g